Live-In Care | How Does It Work?

 Live-In Care | How Does It Work?

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Live-In Care | We don’t have a typical customer…

People consider live-in care for a whole variety of reasons, due to a whole range of conditions (from dementia to physical disabilities) and at different points in their lives. Here are just a few examples of circumstances where our carers can help:

  • Visiting (or domiciliary) care is no longer sufficient.
  • A residential care home hasn’t worked out.
  • Couples looking for a care solution that allows them to live together.
  • Younger people who want to live a full life independently.
  • A hospital discharge that’s dependent on 24 hour care.
  • A young person needing a little extra help to embark on their journey into independent adulthood.
  • Short-term care to give a regular carer a break.
  • If you’re seeking an economic alternative to residential care.
  • Or it can simply be because you want to have the choice to live independently in the privacy and comfort of your own home.

Living according to your lifestyle

We will work with you and your family to understand what quality of life means to you. We’ll then make sure you achieve it. For some, it’s simply providing the dignity of discrete personal care (toileting and washing), the security of feeling safe at night and help getting in and out of bed. Others appreciate us taking away the burden of remembering medication routines. Many appreciate a helping hand maintaining their high standards of housekeeping and laundry while for others being able to get out in the car, keeping up regular social routines and visiting friends gives them the feeling of freedom they want to preserve. Our carers will cover whatever you and your family want them to help with

Are you a caregiver looking for just the right help for your loved one? Are you unsure exactly how much care they need? Complete Home Care can help you. We know how important it is to mange every aspect of patient care, from a patient’s needs to the physician’s orders. That’s why every service we provide is supervised by our professionals and administrated from the initial consultation to recovery or treatment completion. Call Complete Home Care at 561-408-7760.

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Private Home Care | 30 Quotes and Inspirations for Caregivers

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Private Home Care | 30 Quotes and Inspirations for Caregivers

Private Home Care | We hope these inspirational quotes will help you find comfort and peace. Use these quotes as tools. They can empower you to help yourself as well as your loved ones.

A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort.
— Herm Albright

Some days there won’t be a song in your heart. Sing anyway.
— Emory Austin

God gave burdens, he also gave shoulders.
— Yiddish Proverbs

Better a diamond with a flaw than a pebble without one.
— Chinese Proverbs

Physical strength is measured by what we can carry; spiritual by what we can bear.
— Unknown

Forgiveness is not an occasional act: it is an attitude.
— Martin Luther King Jr.

If you can’t change your fate, change your attitude.
— Amy Tan

An inconvenience is an adventure wrongly considered.
— G. K. Chesterton

What happens to a person is less significant than what happens within him.
— Louis L. Mann

Happiness is an attitude. We either make ourselves miserable, or happy and strong. The amount of work is the same.
— Francesca Reigler

You don’t get to choose how you’re going to die, or when. You can only decide how you’re going to live.
— Joan Baez

One person caring about another represents life’s greatest value.
— Jim Rohn

The greatest discovery of my generation is that man can alter his life simply by altering his attitude.
— James Truslow Adams

Never underestimate your problem or your ability to deal with it.
— Robert H. Schuller

Mountains cannot be surmounted except by winding paths.
— Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

Life’s challenges are not supposed to paralyze you; they’re supposed to help you discover who you are.
— Bernice Johnson Reagon

Impossible situations can become possible miracles.
— Robert H. Schuller

When you can think of yesterday without regret and tomorrow without fear, you are near contentment.
— Source Unknown

Be determined to handle any challenge in a way that will make you grow.
— Les Brown

Determination that just won’t quit — that’s what it takes.
— A.J Foyt

About the only thing that comes without effort is old age.
— Source Unknown

People who fight fire with fire usually end up with ashes.
— Abigail Van Buren

Faith has to do with things that are not seen, and hope with things that are not in hand.
— Saint Thomas Acquinas

The beginning of anxiety is the end of faith, and the beginning of true faith is the end of anxiety.
— George E. Mueller

Certain defects are necessary for the existence of individuality.
— Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

Conceal a flaw, and the world will imagine the worst.
— Marcus Valerius Martial

Forgiveness is not a one-time-only event. It is a process.
— Rhonda Britten

If you wish to travel far and fast, travel light. Take off all your envies, jealousies, un-forgiveness, selfishness and fears.
— Glenn Clark

We grow because we struggle, we learn and overcome.
— R. C. Allen

— Things turn out best for those who make the best of the way things turn out.
Jack Buck -Aging care


 

 

 

For more information on private home care please Call Complete Home Care at 561-408-7760.

Private Home Care | 10 Easy Ways to Boost Brain Power in Seniors

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Private Home Care | 10 Easy Ways to Boost Brain Power in Seniors

Private Home Care | Forget almost everything you have been taught over the years about the aging human brain. Almost 70 years ago, a scientist declared that the aging brain diminished in memory, agility, and functionality while increasing in senility. Without much challenge, this theory was accepted for decades and taught as fact.

In reality, more recent studies have shown that the aging brain can continue to function actively and effectively if we recognize its needs for nutrition, challenge, reducing stress, exercise and more. “Use it or lose it,” say authors Alan D. Bragdon and David Gamon, Ph.D., in their book by the same title.

Many of today’s older adults have also been influenced by the long-time assumptions that the brain, mind and memory of an older person is a failing process. Therefore, they turn their daily lives to endless viewing of television, unhealthy eating, and increased complaining while also increasing personal stress. They abandon dreams and direction for the future.

Improve Memory and Mind Function

1. Games, fun and solutions: Introduce games to your parent — games that call for thinking and evaluating before action. Playing cards with others can stimulate brain function while also providing sociable times with family members and friends. Puzzles, including crosswords, picture puzzles and word puzzles are great brain stimulants.

2. Get grandkids involved: Ask them to work on and complete a puzzle or game with grandma or grandma every day, or every week. When such is accomplished, congratulate both grandparent and grandchild for being a great team. Again, social interaction boosts the benefit of doing fun puzzles.

3. Start a diary: Suggest to your parent that she or he start a daily diary, and even buy a quality book or binder plus a special pen to start. Share with your parent that he or she has accomplished much over the years that should be shared and recorded from today’s memory and thinking. Suggest, too, that the diary include “things or projects I want to do,” so to define many positive events and projects for the future. When your parent starts sharing about tomorrow, a lot of stress and depression should start to disappear.

4. Focus on nutrition: Proper nutrition is vital, particularly a diet strong in antioxidants. Fresh fruits and vegetables are vital to provide what other parts of the body or system may now be denying to the brain and its function. Other physical challenges are probably reducing the effectiveness of the immune system; therefore, the addition of all the more antioxidants can definitely benefit the brain and its function. Interestingly, most research endorses coffee and its caffeine ingredient as a benefit to better brain function. And caffeinated teas may be of similar benefit.

5. Get Mom or Dad to stop smoking: Of course, this will be a challenge. But there are no benefits, but only negative effects to the brain from smoking. Smoking also contributes to diseases, including COPD. Remove the ashtrays and lighters from your parent’s quarters. If you do smoke, don’t do it when tending to Mom or Dad. Light up somewhere else.

6. Start walking: Physical exercise and movement is vital to the functioning of the older adult brain and its best functioning. Daily walking, even several times around the block, is something that another family member, even a teenager, can accept as a voluntary assignment. If your parent has current challenges in walking, perhaps 30 minutes each day, then in-home exercises, as simple as standing on one leg for 12 to 20 seconds and shifting to the other leg, may be appropriate and effective. The exercise produces aerobic benefits to the brain as well as the lungs, heart and general physical condition.

7. Invite visitors: Loneliness is a real downer for older adults, particularly if they withdraw from social events or relationships. Invite visitors to visit with Mom or Dad, whether on a one-time or weekly basis. Advise them to not discuss the problems of aging but to call on your parent for observations of historic times and events, current events, particularly because of their knowledge of the past and, importantly, about what your parent wants to do or accomplish tomorrow, next month or even years in the future.

8. Keep them laughing: There’s something to be said for the old saying “Laughter is the best medicine.” The act of laughing has been proven to have health benefits. If your parent is isolated a lot, movies and books can provide entertainment. Both Netflix and blockbuster.com enable you or your parent to order movies online and they will be delivered directly to the home – no need to run out to the video store. In considering the best movies, start with selections from the 1920s and great films by Charlie Chaplin or Buster Keaton. Also include the great international films by Jacques Tati and Jules Dassin, to the outrageous concerts by Victor Borge. These films may represent points of importance in times past for your parent. Viewing the films give a comedic high while also helping to clobber depression and its negative side effects.

9. Get out of the house: At least once each week, go somewhere with your parent. It may to a restaurant or bistro for a meal, a visit to a fair, entertainment or special event in your region or, even something as simple as lunch at the senior center. This continues to open the world to your parent, while ensuring that he or she is still part of it.

10. Recognize your parent for his or her gains: This is a scary time for most older adults. When they were working or being active in the community, your parents felt respected and important. In older age, that sense of acceptance or identification is often lost. Try to get them involved in volunteering, where they can regain that sense of accomplishment. Additionally, praise your parent for even small accomplishments and recognize each success.

For more information and tips on private home care please call Complete Home Care at Call 561-408-7760 or 888-823-0428

Home Care | Noticing Care Patterns

Home Care | Noticing Care Patterns

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Home Care | My parents were early risers. They went to bed early and got up early in the morning. I’m a night owl. I usually go to bed around 1 PM and sleep-in when I can. Sleep patterns vary among individuals and often change when we age. Even the way we start the day is unique to an individual. Some people are up and at it as soon as they rise, while others (myself included) like to ease into the day without a lot of conversation, enjoying a quiet slow start to the day. When I first began as a caregiver for my mother-in-law she was a morning person. She got up early, showered, dressed, made her breakfast, made her bed and was still ready and waiting for me to pick her up for a 9:30 appointment. As the years passed she required more and more time to get ready.  Now it is about 11:00 before she is ready to start her day. We adjusted to this by making afternoon appointments and I modified my arrival time so that I came later giving her time to get ready at a pace that was comfortable for her.  Now that she is in hospice care part of the planning is coordinating her health care workers. In the beginning everyone wanted to come early in the morning way before my mother-in-law was ready to begin her day. She was willing to try this for a few days but it soon became evident that this was too taxing. We then scheduled her health care workers to begin at 11:00. She was much more relaxed, rested and ready to share in her care. The other scheduling issue we had to resolve was to use all the days of the week for her support services. In the beginning the health care worker, nurse, Chaplin, social worker and hospice volunteers would overlap and come on the same day. Although she wanted to avail herself of their services she got very tired and was extremely fatigued after their visits. We were able to create a schedule that allowed us to minimize the overlap and she now gladly awaits their arrival. I guess the lesson to be learned in this for the caregiver is that people have different internal schedules. When providing care for an individual you must take this into account if you want your assistance to be effective and less invasive.

Are you a caregiver looking for just the right help for your loved one? Are you unsure exactly how much care they need? Complete Home Care can help you. We know how important it is to mange every aspect of patient care, from a patient’s needs to the physician’s orders. That’s why every service we provide is supervised by our professionals and administrated from the initial consultation to recovery or treatment completion. Call Complete Home Care at 561-408-7760.

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Home Health Care | Make Home Interesting

Home Health Care | Make Home Interesting

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Home Health Care | When my mother-in-law gave up driving we recognized that her world would get smaller. To offset this we decided to bring as much of the world that we could to her. We needed to enrich her home environment and foster opportunities for her to interact with it. We started with seasonal plantings around her patio that she could water and nurture. She could observe them from her kitchen table and often commented on their beauty. Next we installed a birdbath. A birdbath involves less work than a bird feeder, attracts fewer pests, is cleaner and requires that you only add water. It wasn’t long before the birds started coming. A consequence of this was that my mother-in-law wanted to be able to identify them. We gave her a bird book and now she spends time classifying her feathered visitors. Of course the next logical step was a birdhouse and every spring and summer she sits on her patio in the early evening and the wrens serenade her. She especially enjoys watching the fledglings take their first flight.  Growing things is always an interesting endeavor. Each spring, we put patio plants like tomatoes, eggplant and herbs on her patio. My mother-in-law enjoys caring for them, watching them grow and ripen. However, the icing on the cake is when she can use them in a meal that she has prepared. In the winter months we would put paper whites and amaryllis bulbs throughout the house. She enjoys the touch of spring in the winter, and often gives us periodic reports on their growth and progress. We have a pet dog that we inherited from our son and from time to time we take him to my mother-in-laws for a visit. She loves his antics and enjoys the contact comfort of petting him. When she thinks we are not looking, she will spoil him with a treat. As a caregiver you can do many things to enrich and stimulate the individual in your care. Just listen and be creative.

Are you a caregiver looking for just the right help for your loved one? Are you unsure exactly how much care they need? Complete Home Care can help you. We know how important it is to mange every aspect of patient care, from a patient’s needs to the physician’s orders. That’s why every home health care service we provide is supervised by our professionals and administrated from the initial consultation to recovery or treatment completion. Call Complete Home Care at 561-408-7760.

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Live-In Care | Managing Relationships

 Live-In Care | Managing Relationships

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Live-In Care | Over the past three years my mother-in-law has had a variety of caregivers. Some for a week at a time, some for a few months and others have been with for her for a year or more. During this time we have had to intervene and negotiate a variety of issues between her and the caregivers. Usually it is as simple as a communication problem or a difference in expectations. I remember that my mother-in-law’s first issue was with a very competent caregiver that appeared, and was very young. One of her duties was to assist my mother-in-law with her shower. My mother-in-law, because of her age, felt very self-conscious about this and she requested we find someone older. Our solution was to have her caregivers switch times and days so that an older woman was available for her showers and the younger woman prepared her meals and helped with the household chores. My mother-in-law actually developed a good relationship with the younger woman stating that she gave the best back and shoulder massages. She still works with my mother-in-law to this day.

Like any relationship there is a certain ebb and flow that takes place between the caregiver and the client as a result of their individual personalities and their daily life experience. So it is important as the overseer in this relationship to keep everything in perspective when mediating these issues. On some days my mother-in-law really likes her caregiver and on others she is not as satisfied. Usually by reassuring my mother-in-law that we are her advocate, listening carefully to her issues and discussing them objectively, we are able to resolve most of them.

My mother-in-law would be quite content, on most days, to just have a companion but she needs the other services that the caregivers provide. She sometimes feels she is not getting enough attention when they are doing their work tidying up or preparing meals. On these days she looks on the caregiver in a less than positive manner.  We need to remind her of the caregivers responsibilities and that when they do their work they are not ignoring her but helping make her life easier. The relationship between caregiver and client is a dynamic one, and it constantly needs to be adapted and modified. A good home care agency will be able to help assist you in managing this relationship. 

Are you a caregiver looking for just the right help for your loved one? Are you unsure exactly how much care they need? Complete Home Care can help you. We know how important it is to mange every aspect of patient care, from a patient’s needs to the physician’s orders. That’s why every service we provide is supervised by our professionals and administrated from the initial consultation to recovery or treatment completion. Call Complete Home Care at 561-408-7760.

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Home Health Care | Give Your Loved Ones Choices

Home Health Care | Give Your Loved Ones Choices

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Home Health Care | One of the key objectives of a caregiver is preserving the dignity of the individual in your care. When this journey with my mother-in-law began she was mentally acute, all her senses functioned normally, she was ambulatory and semi-independent. But as the years passed her hearing grew worse, her vision weakened, her cardiac condition worsened, she fell and broke a leg and is now confined to a wheel chair. In addition her ability to process information has slowed and her short term memory fails from time to time. Having her understand and make decisions about her care is becoming more difficult. In the past she understood the options given to her by her doctors, medical support staff and caregivers. Making these decisions reinforced her sense of independence and self-worth.

As her ability to understand and process information declined we had to come up with another way for her to continue being an active partner in her care. One strategy we’ve used when a decision has to be made concerning her care is to make a list with her of all her options. The repetitive organized nature of the process increases her ability to understand and clarify the information. Ranking or prioritizing the options helps her see which choice she feels is most important to her relative to the others.

To illustrate this recently my mother-in-law lost a cap on one of her teeth. There were some structural issues so a simple replacement was not possible. We sat down and discussed with her all the options the dentist gave us with their ramifications from do nothing at all to a root extraction with a flipper tooth replacement. We made a list of all her options discussing the steps each would entail. We then had her order her choices giving the reason for her selection. At the completion of this task my mother-in-law understood her options and felt confident in her decision. This manipulation of information discussing, listing, and prioritizing helped her to organize and understand her choices.

One of the difficult decisions as a caregiver is recognizing the tipping point when the individual is no longer capable of making their own decisions about their care. Until that time as caregivers we must utilize a variety of strategies to help guide them in making decisions for themselves.

Are you a caregiver looking for just the right help for your loved one? Are you unsure exactly how much care they need? Complete Home Care can help you. We know how important it is to mange every aspect of patient care, from a patient’s needs to the physician’s orders. That’s why every home health care service we provide is supervised by our professionals and administrated from the initial consultation to recovery or treatment completion. Call Complete Home Care at 561-408-7760.

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Companion Care | Communication Tips

 Companion Care | Communication Tips

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Companion Care | How can you better communicate with your care recipient? Check out these 6 tips below and tell us what you think!

1. Speak Clearly and Distinctly: Almost 30% of persons older than 65 have some sort of hearing loss so be sure to speak a little louder, a little slower, but not too much of either because then you may come off as condescending. Use a gentle and calm voice and keep sentences short and simple.
2. Be Mindful of your Environment: Watch for background noise from a tv or radio.  When in conversation, try to be face to face and at a similar level. This is because peripheral vision is more limited so they may have trouble understanding if that can’t see you. Being at their same level, such as sitting if they are in a wheelchair, will also be less threatening and gives the nonverbal cue that you are engaged and interested in what they have to say.
3. Use Humor: Laughter is great medicine and helps to build rapport and diffuses a lot of uncomfortable situations. So go ahead, use your best knock knock joke.
4. Be a Good Listener: Try not to interrupt or fill in silence because they may be thinking about what was just said or may be thinking of a response. Also, if you are working with someone who has some cognitive impairment, such as Alzheimer’s or dementia, you may notice they tell you the same story on multiple occasions. While this may be “boring”, this is an indication that this memory has some significance for them. So let them tell you again and just listen as if it’s the first time.
5. Reminiscence Therapy: Reminiscing helps the elderly recall memories from the past and promotes a sense of belonging and feeling valued. It also helps maintain communication skills and imparts wisdom, skills and information to their partner in conversation.  So while they may not remember who the current president is, they will most likely remember things from their distant past. Some easy ways to trigger this might be to look at their old photos together or just simply ask them where they grew up, or what kind of jobs they held.
 6. The simplest conversation starter? A warm smile and sincere Hello!

Are you a caregiver looking for just the right help for your loved one? Are you unsure exactly how much care they need? Complete Home Care can help you. We know how important it is to mange every aspect of patient care, from a patient’s needs to the physician’s orders. That’s why every service we provide is supervised by our professionals and administrated from the initial consultation to recovery or treatment completion. Call Complete Home Care at 561-408-7760.

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Private Home Care | Questions To Ask An Agency

Private Home Care | Questions To Ask An Agency
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Private Home Care | Selecting a private home care agency can be a difficult task. It’s not your typical business transaction. We tend to think only about the actual caregiver that will be sent to your home.  But like the caregiver, you must have some “chemistry” with the agency and the way they operate. They will work with you to make sure your parent, spouse, or loved gets the best caregiver for them-and it’s often the office staff that you’ll turn to with any questions or concerns you may have.

Here’s a list of questions that I think you should know the answers to before engaging a company.

  • What is the qualification of the aide? (you want to make sure the aide is qualified to perform the services your loved one needs)
  • Is the Agency full insured?  (Don’t be afraid to ask for a copy of their insurance certificate)
  • Is the Aide insured. Is she/he covered by Workman’s Compensation Insurance should they be injured on the job?
  • What kind of background checks do they perform on their caregivers?
  • If they drive your parent, have they checked their driving record and the condition of their car, should they be using their own car?
  • Does the caregiver have a supervisor?
    • If so, does she/he visit the home? How often?
  • What does the caregiver do if she/he has a question or doesn’t know what to do?
  • What does the agency do if the caregiver is late, or sick. Do they have a policy in place that is followed?
  • What does the agency do if you want to contact after hours with a serious question or emergency?
    • Is there a supervisor available 24/7?
    • Do their telephone go to any individual or to a service?
  • What if you want to contact the agency during work hours?
    • Is there someone available that will know who you are?
  • If you live far from your parent, can the agency set up a weekly communication with you?
  • Do they require a contract?
  • How do they bill?
    • Do they pay the caregiver directly, or do you?
  • Do they have a tipping or gift accepting policy?
  • Can your parent (or other loved one) and/or you interview the potential caregivers  and provide input?
  • Can they provide you with references from other clients?
  • Do they accept Long-Term Care Insurance?
  • Are they Medicare approved, or do they work with Medicare Approved Agencies.
    • (This is important if there has been a recent medical event or hospitalization that requires specific in-home care prescribed by your physician. Typically this would provide a limited amount medical services that would be covered by Medicare).  Non medical care is an out of pocket expense (or covered by a Long-term care insurance policy) and not paid for by medicare. Often an agency providing non-medical prescribed home care will work with you to coordinate any services that could be covered by Medicare.

Are you a caregiver looking for just the right help for your loved one? Are you unsure exactly how much care they need? Complete Home Care can help you. We know how important it is to mange every aspect of patient care, from a patient’s needs to the physician’s orders. That’s why every service we provide is supervised by our professionals and administrated from the initial consultation to recovery or treatment completion. Call Complete Home Care at 561-408-7760.

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Companion Care | Agency Selection Criteria

 Companion Care | Agency Selection Criteria

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Companion Care | When talking with the agencies by phone, keep the following selection criteria in mind:

  • Do they provide the services that your mother needs?  Home Care companies are licensed to provide specific services, so not all agencies are the same. For example Companion/Homemaker companies provide non-medical services. Home Health Agencies are licensed to perform more “hands on” tasks.
  • Are they  licensed, properly insured, and in good standing? Don’t hesitate to ask for a copy of their insurance certificate. If they refuse, then move to the next company on your list. You can review their state inspection reports using State records, which are available to the public in many states.
  • Do they have a plan of action in case of an emergency or if the caregiver doesn’t know what to do?  Knowing how they’ll handle an unforeseen medical event or other emergency will give you confidence that your mother is in good hands.
  • Do you feel comfortable with either the owner or the administrator of the Agency? While everyone wants to hire an aide that is personable and skilled, remember that this is a business transaction and you must feel comfortable with the person who is ultimately responsible for your mother’s wellbeing.

Are you a caregiver looking for just the right help for your loved one? Are you unsure exactly how much care they need? Complete Home Care can help you. We know how important it is to mange every aspect of patient care, from a patient’s needs to the physician’s orders. That’s why every service we provide is supervised by our professionals and administrated from the initial consultation to recovery or treatment completion. Call Complete Home Care at 561-408-7760.

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